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Cthulhu Cult
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WanderingDroid
THE LOOSE CANNON

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Location: Welfare Kingdom of California

Cthulhu Cult

Yeah, you guys think they exist?

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

(yes... I did copy and paste...you try and typed it)


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Old Post Aug 24th, 2009 10:26 PM
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Symmetric Chaos
Fractal King

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Location: Ko-ro-ba

HASTUR!

HASTUR!!

HASTUR!!!


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A juvenal prank.

Old Post Aug 24th, 2009 10:47 PM
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dadudemon
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Have you guys heard of the "Bloop"?


It is some freaky shiznit. I am completely honest when I thought for the first time that I didn't know jack about nature when I read about the bloop.

"The Bloop is the name given to an ultra-low frequency underwater sound detected by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration several times during the summer of 1997. The source of the sound remains unknown.


The sound, traced to somewhere around 50 S 100 W (South American southwest coast), was detected repeatedly by the Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array, which uses U.S. Navy equipment originally designed to detect Soviet submarines. According to the NOAA description, it "rises rapidly in frequency over about one minute and was of sufficient amplitude to be heard on multiple sensors, at a range of over 5,000 km." According to scientists who have studied the phenomenon it matches the audio profile of a living creature but there is no known animal that could have produced the sound. If the sound did come from an animal, it would reportedly have to be several times the size of the largest known animal on Earth, the Blue Whale.[1]"


Since the sound came from the area from HP Lovecraft's underwater, sunken, city where Cthulhu is supposed to live. Coincidence? What did Lovecraft know that we don't know about?


Sources:


http://archives.cnn.com/2002/TECH/science/06/13/bloop/

http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/cthulhu2.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloop



It's related to the Slow Down.


"Slow Down is a sound recorded on May 19, 1997, in the Equatorial Pacific ocean by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The source of the sound remains unknown.

The name was given because the sound slowly decreases in frequency over about 7 minutes. The sound was detected at 15S 115W / 15S 115W / -15; -115. It was recorded using an autonomous hydrophone array.[1]"

http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acou...noise97139.html


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Old Post Aug 30th, 2009 07:03 PM
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ArtificialGlory
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by dadudemon
Have you guys heard of the "Bloop"?


It is some freaky shiznit. I am completely honest when I thought for the first time that I didn't know jack about nature when I read about the bloop.

"The Bloop is the name given to an ultra-low frequency underwater sound detected by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration several times during the summer of 1997. The source of the sound remains unknown.


The sound, traced to somewhere around 50 S 100 W (South American southwest coast), was detected repeatedly by the Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array, which uses U.S. Navy equipment originally designed to detect Soviet submarines. According to the NOAA description, it "rises rapidly in frequency over about one minute and was of sufficient amplitude to be heard on multiple sensors, at a range of over 5,000 km." According to scientists who have studied the phenomenon it matches the audio profile of a living creature but there is no known animal that could have produced the sound. If the sound did come from an animal, it would reportedly have to be several times the size of the largest known animal on Earth, the Blue Whale.[1]"


Since the sound came from the area from HP Lovecraft's underwater, sunken, city where Cthulhu is supposed to live. Coincidence? What did Lovecraft know that we don't know about?


Sources:


http://archives.cnn.com/2002/TECH/science/06/13/bloop/

http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/cthulhu2.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloop



It's related to the Slow Down.


"Slow Down is a sound recorded on May 19, 1997, in the Equatorial Pacific ocean by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The source of the sound remains unknown.

The name was given because the sound slowly decreases in frequency over about 7 minutes. The sound was detected at 15S 115W / 15S 115W / -15; -115. It was recorded using an autonomous hydrophone array.[1]"

http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acou...noise97139.html


Cthulhu. It was Cthulhu.


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Red lights flicker madly, a siren rings and jolts are shaking the bridge as I run desperately towards the nearest escape pod. The escape bay is already on fire. I see dead or injured or dying people everywhere. The other commanding officers and myself are abandoning the crew and passengers to certain death. As my pod glides slowly in the field of stars, I can see the Hive-Ship becoming smaller and smaller, ripped apart by the deadly laser beams of the Ancients' battlecruisers. The battle for the Arc is lost. I failed, and I'm watching the death of one billion of my own kind, when the Hive is finally destroyed in a blinding, silent explosion.

Old Post Aug 30th, 2009 10:31 PM
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dadudemon
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by ArtificialGlory
Cthulhu. It was Cthulhu.



Whatever it was, it was several times bigger than a blue whale. That's effiin' HUGE!


That really freaks me out that something like that is out there that we haven't discovered. VERY creepy. I must say that off all the things on this Earth, that's really the only "creature" scare that I've ever had. Probaly the only creature "phobia" if you want to call it that. The fear of the unknown is effective against me...at least in this situation. I don't want to be on a boat trip and then get attacked by some massive creature that makes a blue whale looks small.


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Last edited by dadudemon on Aug 30th, 2009 at 11:24 PM

Old Post Aug 30th, 2009 11:21 PM
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Symmetric Chaos
Fractal King

Gender: Male
Location: Ko-ro-ba

quote: (post)
Originally posted by dadudemon
Whatever it was, it was several times bigger than a blue whale. That's effiin' HUGE!


That really freaks me out that something like that is out there that we haven't discovered. VERY creepy. I must say that off all the things on this Earth, that's really the only "creature" scare that I've ever had. Probaly the only creature "phobia" if you want to call it that. The fear of the unknown is effective against me...at least in this situation. I don't want to be on a boat trip and then get attacked by some massive creature that makes a blue whale looks small.


Couldn't it be tectonic plates grinding against each other?


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Old Post Aug 31st, 2009 12:10 AM
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WanderingDroid
THE LOOSE CANNON

Gender: Male
Location: Welfare Kingdom of California

quote: (post)
Originally posted by Symmetric Chaos
Couldn't it be tectonic plates grinding against each other?


That's what they want you to believe. How many tectonic plates grinding do you hear per day?


(sorry if I sound jerkish...just saying)


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Old Post Aug 31st, 2009 09:14 PM
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dadudemon
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Gender: Male
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by Symmetric Chaos
Couldn't it be tectonic plates grinding against each other?



No.


Wouldn't even sound remotely close to the same. It is similar to current animal audio recordings, but not quite a blue whales. It's very animal, in nature.




And, if what you said was true, they would have tons of audio recordings of tectonic plates sliding against each other as they are constantly moving and there are dozens of Earth quakes each day.



More to the point, I believe the DO have audio captures of Earthquakes.


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Old Post Sep 1st, 2009 04:17 AM
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Robtard
Plebeian

Gender: Unspecified
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If it is some gigantic living creature, I'm guessing it's some unknown species of sea life, before an intergalactic overlord of insanity, billions of years old.

That or the Cloverfield beast.


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Old Post Sep 1st, 2009 10:46 PM
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dadudemon
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by Robtard
If it is some gigantic living creature, I'm guessing it's some unknown species of sea life, before an intergalactic overlord of insanity, billions of years old.

That or the Cloverfield beast.


Oh, definitely.


Just that, the unknown scares the shit out of me.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 01:43 AM
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Robtard
Plebeian

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Wouldn't worry too much about it, as it'd be evolved to live at great depths and pressures, should it'd die should it try and surface.

Cloverfield beast withstanding, then were ****ed, at least those of us living coastal.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 04:44 PM
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jaden101
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There's so much we don't know about what goes on inside the earth that it's likely that it's some process either in the crust or below that we don't know about yet. The idea that it's some super giant creature is a bit silly as it'd have to feed and there most likely wouldn't be enough food in the ocean to sustain it especially in the areas and depths where it would have to reside for humans to never encounter it.

Remember that the ocean is actually very sparsely populated. There is huge swathes of ocean where there is virtually no life at all. Mostly life only occurs where there are ocean currents like the gulf stream as there isn't enough oxygen or nutrients in the water to sustain the base of the food chain, plankton.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 07:59 PM
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dadudemon
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
There's so much we don't know about what goes on inside the earth that it's likely that it's some process either in the crust or below that we don't know about yet. The idea that it's some super giant creature is a bit silly as it'd have to feed and there most likely wouldn't be enough food in the ocean to sustain it especially in the areas and depths where it would have to reside for humans to never encounter it.


It would just have to eat more krill than a blue whale. Several times the amount. That's not silly or absurd to think that, at all. Blue Whales don't eat all day long. Adult Blue Whales eat over 3 tons of krill and other animals, a day. A larger animal would be able to get more in each gulp. Who knows, they may spend the exact same amount of time feeding and get 9 tons of small animal life.

It's extremely unlikely to be some sort of volcanic or tectonic process. They've matched the audio to existing animal profiles. Also considering that we have measured an many occasions the various "sounds" of tectonics and other things that are "heard" from the ocean.

quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
Remember that the ocean is actually very sparsely populated. There is huge swathes of ocean where there is virtually no life at all. Mostly life only occurs where there are ocean currents like the gulf stream as there isn't enough oxygen or nutrients in the water to sustain the base of the food chain, plankton.


While the open ocean lacks the diversity seen in reefs and coastal regions, there is still large amounts of life. The diversity is lacking, of course, but it is far from sparsely populated, as you suggest. Life exists, in diversity, near the surface, in almost ever single portion of the ocean. From there, lower level fish still survive. Even in the Arctic and antarctic areas, there is significant life near the surface, under the ice.

One thing is certain: where there is water, there is life as we know it.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 08:50 PM
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Robtard
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Except krill (as we know it) don't live that deep.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 09:47 PM
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dadudemon
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by Robtard
Except krill (as we know it) don't live that deep.


The were able to not only triangulate the location, but also the depth?


And, whales go fairly deep to find their giant squid. No reason to think a large creature would also not go that deep. This, of course, assumes that the creature is as deep as you imply.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 09:56 PM
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jaden101
It's Fat Albert

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quote: (post)
Originally posted by dadudemon
It would just have to eat more krill than a blue whale. Several times the amount. That's not silly or absurd to think that, at all. Blue Whales don't eat all day long. Adult Blue Whales eat over 3 tons of krill and other animals, a day. A larger animal would be able to get more in each gulp. Who knows, they may spend the exact same amount of time feeding and get 9 tons of small animal life.

It's extremely unlikely to be some sort of volcanic or tectonic process. They've matched the audio to existing animal profiles. Also considering that we have measured an many occasions the various "sounds" of tectonics and other things that are "heard" from the ocean.



While the open ocean lacks the diversity seen in reefs and coastal regions, there is still large amounts of life. The diversity is lacking, of course, but it is far from sparsely populated, as you suggest. Life exists, in diversity, near the surface, in almost ever single portion of the ocean. From there, lower level fish still survive. Even in the Arctic and antarctic areas, there is significant life near the surface, under the ice.

One thing is certain: where there is water, there is life as we know it.


Are you familiar with the fact that there is 5 ocean deserts?

The bloop is supposed to have originate in one of the more barren areas of the ocean just shouth of one of the ocean deserts.

Your point about the Arctic and Antarctic tell me you're unfamiliar with the studies into the oceans because they are actually some of the most active areas of ocean going life.

Oh...I also made a mistake. The problem isn't Oxygen...It's Nitrogen. While there is huge amounts of it trapped in sea water, most microscopic organisms can't utilise it and so very few exist in those parts of the oceans. Some can, Trichodesmium for example, but because most can't, they can't form the basis of the food chain that sustains larger creatures.

The best example I can think of is that in the TV series "Nature's great events" from the BBC...The episodes "The great tide" and "The great feast" both show how neccesary the smallest animals are to sustain the food chain.

So the problem in the area where these noises came from (off the west coast of South America) is that there just isn't the numbers of organisms available.

This is no different from the Loch Ness Monster theory. Loch Ness is virtually lifeless for it's size and depth because there is so much peat in the water that no light penetrates below about 20ft. There just isn't enough fish to support anything bigger.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 10:02 PM
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Robtard
Plebeian

Gender: Unspecified
Location: Ca

quote: (post)
Originally posted by dadudemon
The were able to not only triangulate the location, but also the depth?


And, whales go fairly deep to find their giant squid. No reason to think a large creature would also not go that deep. This, of course, assumes that the creature is as deep as you imply.


It's it's supposed to be super massive, it would likely have to live extremely deep, as to remain hidden from humans all this time. As I think some ship's or sub's sonar would have noticed something this massive swimming about.

Whales do go deep, but not that deep. Once you get to very great depths, life (which we've brought up in pressurized cages) starts to take on flatter and flatter forms, as to survive the crushing pressures. This thing would have to look like one ginormous carpet-like creature and it probably couldn't survive coming up in depth to hunt giant squid and the like.


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Old Post Sep 3rd, 2009 10:37 PM
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dadudemon
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
The bloop is supposed to have originate in one of the more barren areas of the ocean just shouth of one of the ocean deserts.


I could have sworn that I was the one who linked to that information.


And your entire argument about a creature that large not being found in a location like it was indicates that you are unaware of the pegalic fish that exist in the open ocean. You do know that there are large creatures that pass through oceanic deserts, don't you?

What about the increased phytoplankton concentration in the region the bloop was heard from? You do know that there is a large drop north of the area?

What about migration patterns for the creature?

Would not the large animal be able to cover vast distances of ocean, while in search of food?

quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
Your point about the Arctic and Antarctic tell me you're unfamiliar with the studies into the oceans because they are actually some of the most active areas of ocean going life.


You're attempt to pass of "ocean desert" as a anything but a relative term to the other parts of the ocean, tells me that you're arguing for the sake of arguing, now. Nothing you've said changes what I said.


And, you have a bad habit of saying the same things I do.

"Even in the Arctic and antarctic areas, there is significant life near the surface, under the ice."


I guess "significant life" doesn't cut it for you?


And, no, you've shown your knowledge of oceanic life is lacking. You'd know that information on sympagic life is limited and the bounds of biodiversity relatively unknown. This applies for much of the oceanic strata in the Arctic and Antarctic areas. Wanna talk about deserts, there's your oceanic deserts. Life is extremely limited at the most treacherous parts of the poles. Very little phytoplankton can grow there.



More on topic:

Phytoplankton = the vast majority of zooplankton food.

Zooplankton = a probable food source for an animal 3 times larger than a blue whale.


But, you probably want to start talking about how much chlorophyll containg organisms live near the poles. Yada yada. No need to keep talking in circles with you and I telling each other what we already know.




quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
Oh...I also made a mistake. The problem isn't Oxygen...It's Nitrogen. While there is huge amounts of it trapped in sea water, most microscopic organisms can't utilise it and so very few exist in those parts of the oceans. Some can, Trichodesmium for example, but because most can't, they can't form the basis of the food chain that sustains larger creatures.

The best example I can think of is that in the TV series "Nature's great events" from the BBC...The episodes "The great tide" and "The great feast" both show how neccesary the smallest animals are to sustain the food chain.


K.

So how does that change anything I've said?

It doesn't.


Next, I supposed you'll reply with phytoplankton density being drastically reduced in number, in these deserts, and then say that the Zooplankton rely on those phytoplankton, then tell me that the pelagic animals are few and far between in these deserts and that I don't know what I'm talking about.


There's no need to cover things that both of us already know.

You made faulty assumption while calling me silly, I provided insight. That's it.


quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
So the problem in the area where these noises came from (off the west coast of South America) is that there just isn't the numbers of organisms available.

This is no different from the Loch Ness Monster theory. Loch Ness is virtually lifeless for it's size and depth because there is so much peat in the water that no light penetrates below about 20ft. There just isn't enough fish to support anything bigger.


Yeah, cept you kind of already hit on currents, life, and life following currents. And I hit on large, macroscopic life, existing in the open ocean, outside of major currents.

Not only this, but I've provided additional insight, still further, from my previous post.



And, you've yet to refute the largest piece of evidence that is not in your favor: they matched the audio to known animal profiles.



If you don't think large creatures swim through the weak spots, then you're wrong.

You do know that blue whales pass through that area as part of their migration patterns, right?

You do know that there is a migration patter for humpback whales, right in that area, right?



(please log in to view the image)

(please log in to view the image)

But, you're right, I'm wrong. We can settle at that and I'll go back to wondering what kind of creature it was and you'll go back to thinking my wondering is silly.


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Old Post Sep 5th, 2009 08:25 AM
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jaden101
It's Fat Albert

Gender: Male
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quote:
K. So how does that change anything I've said? It doesn't. Next, I supposed you'll reply with phytoplankton density being drastically reduced in number, in these deserts, and then say that the Zooplankton rely on those phytoplankton, then tell me that the pelagic animals are few and far between in these deserts and that I don't know what I'm talking about. There's no need to cover things that both of us already know. You made faulty assumption while calling me silly, I provided insight. That's it.


So if you knew what I stated then why state this?

quote:
Even in the Arctic and antarctic areas, there is significant life near the surface, under the ice.


Like those areas should somehow have less density of life?

And actually, if you superimpose the migration patterns of the whales to those of the ocean deserts you'll see that they either stop short of them of avoid them by going around them (Particularly in the case of the one in South America where the destination is a small but dense feeding area.

There's a reason they're called migration "routes"

Just think of it as going from the east coast to the west coast of the US...Between the places people actually give a **** about, you have to pass over thousands of miles of empty pointless shit that has the occasional weird looking inbred form of life.

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/storie...ages/globe2.jpg

Large picture ^
laughing


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Old Post Sep 5th, 2009 10:18 AM
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dadudemon
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quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
So if you knew what I stated then why state this?



Dude, I'm not going to explain a conversation that you could see just a tad up the page.

If you REALLY must know, it's cause you said this:

quote:
The idea that it's some super giant creature is a bit silly as it'd have to feed and there most likely wouldn't be enough food in the ocean to sustain it especially in the areas and depths where it would have to reside for humans to never encounter it.

Remember that the ocean is actually very sparsely populated. There is huge swathes of ocean where there is virtually no life at all.


We aren't doing this, again, Jaden. No way do I feel like requoting myself or yourself, over and over again.

quote: (post)
Originally posted by jaden101
Like those areas should somehow have less density of life?

And actually, if you superimpose the migration patterns of the whales to those of the ocean deserts you'll see that they either stop short of them of avoid them by going around them (Particularly in the case of the one in South America where the destination is a small but dense feeding area.

There's a reason they're called migration "routes"

Just think of it as going from the east coast to the west coast of the US...Between the places people actually give a **** about, you have to pass over thousands of miles of empty pointless shit that has the occasional weird looking inbred form of life.

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/storie...ages/globe2.jpg

Large picture ^
laughing



Woah woah woah.

Why did you skip the whole part where I disproved this argument of yours:

quote:
So the problem in the area where these noises came from (off the west coast of South America) is that there just isn't the numbers of organisms available.



To which I replied:


quote:
If you don't think large creatures swim through the weak spots, then you're wrong.

You do know that blue whales pass through that area as part of their migration patterns, right?

You do know that there is a migration patter for humpback whales, right in that area, right?


I don't want to start arguing your strawmans. (lol, doesn't sound right.) I wanna stay on topic.



Instead, it looks like you're arguing a strawman. I don't care that the whales stop just short of the empty ocean (which isn't true, the swim through some of it.) That's not the point. You tried arguing Ocean Deserts being a factor and not enough food for really large creature to feed off of.

The area the creature was in is NOT part of the southern pacific ocean desert. On top of that, both Whales swim through a relative desert portion in the southern pacific desert.

Since the creature was heard in an area that Baleen whales are found in a regular pattern, this directly contradicts your whole argument. On top of that, those same whales swim right through an ocean desert. This destroys both points in your argument and your ocean desert comment was a strawman, as the bloop was not heard in an ocean desert.


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Old Post Sep 5th, 2009 07:20 PM
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